DR. MARK J. RUSSO, MD, MS

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Mitral Valve Repair

What is Mitral Valve Repair?

Mitral valve repair is the best option for nearly all patients with a mitral regurgitation (a leaking valve). Heart valve repair is preferable, because a person’s own tissues are preserved.

Mitral valve repair can be performed minimally invasively and with a catheter (Mitraclip)

At RWJUH, most patients isolated minimally invasive valve patients spend less than 3 days in the hospital 

What are the advantages of mitral valve repair?

  • A significantly lower risk of stroke
  • A lower rate of infection.
  • Improved long-term survival with mitral valve repair.
  • After mitral valve repair, blood thinners are not required.
  • After a successful valve repair the need for reoperation is less than 5 in 100 at 20 years

What is the risk of mitral valve surgery?

For asympotmatic patients undgoing mitral valve surgery, the risk of peri-operative death is significantly less than 1 in 100. Furthermore, after a successful valve repair the need for reoperation is less than 5 in 100 at 20 years

The risk of peri-operative death after mitral valve surgery is less than 1%.

How is Mitral Valve Regurgitation (including Mitral Valve Prolapse) Treated?

 

The standard of care for patients with symptomatic Mitral Valve Regurgitation (including Mitral Valve Prolapse) is mitral valve surgery repair or replacement.   

What is Mitral valve Prolapse?

Mitral valve prolapse, also known as click-murmur syndrome, Barlow’s syndrome, balloon mitral valve, or floppy valve syndrome, is the bulging of one or both of the mitral valve flaps (leaflets) into the left atrium during the contraction of the heart. One or both of the flaps may not close properly, allowing the blood to leak backward (regurgitation). This regurgitation may result in a murmur (abnormal sound in the heart due to turbulent blood flow). Mitral regurgitation (backward flow of blood), if present at all, is generally mild.

It is estimated that mitral valve prolapse occurs in less than 3 percent of the population.

What is Minimally Invasive Mitral Surgery?


Minimally invasive valve surgery is a specialized approach to treating heart valve disease. Rather than making a large incision through the breastbone (sternum) to gain access to the heart, this method uses sophisticated instruments to perform the surgery through a smaller incision at the side of the chest.

What is the Mitral Valve?

The mitral valve is located between the left atrium and the left ventricle. It is composed of two leaflets or flaps. Normally the flaps are held tightly closed during left ventricular contraction (systole) by the chordae tendineae (small tendon “cords” that connect the flaps to the muscles of the heart). In Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP), the flaps enlarge and stretch inward toward the left atrium, sometimes “snapping” during systole, and may allow some backflow of blood into the left atrium (regurgitation).

Dr. Russo is among the most experienced transcatheter surgeons in the United States, and he has taught these novel procedures to physicians thoughout the world.

What is Mitraclip?


MitraClip is FDA approved for the treatment of mitral regurgitation. The device is a small clip that is attached to your mitral valve leaflet using special catheters and imaging technqiues. It treats mitral regurgitation by allowing your mitral valve to close more completely, thus restoring normal blood flow through your heart and to your body.

This procedure does not require opening the chest or stopping the heart. Instead, through a vein in the leg, a thin tube (called a catheter) is guided to the mitral valve.

What is Mitral Valve Regurgitation?

Mitral valve regurgitation (MR), also known as a leaking mitral valve, This regurgitation may result in a murmur (abnormal sound in the heart due to turbulent blood flow). Barlow’s syndrome, occurs when one or both of the flaps may not close properly, allowing the blood to leak backward (regurgitation).